16th Jan 2014


So, how do you like your pink?


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With the arrival of radiant orchid as the fashion color of 2014 we say, “glad you joined the party.” We have been curating and designing with various pinks for several years now. We love it. The deep orchid, saturated color of pink adds a great feminine touch to black or white or navy. Pink stones come in so many delicious hues. We will address four of our favorite pink stones below.They
are: pink sapphire, pink diamond, pink topaz and pink tourmaline.

The most common pink that comes to mind might be that of a pink sapphire. Did you know that they are corundums in crystal structure and therefore technically also a ruby? It’s a matter of degrees when it comes to a burmese ruby versus a pink sapphire.

Pink sapphire crystal

Pink sapphire crystal

Pink sapphires, especially natural ones, have shot up in price particularly the larger AGL certified natural stones. The variation in color can go from a screaming bubble gum pink to a very quiet purplish pink or blush pink. Usually the more intense the pink, the more desirable, but it’s ultimately a matter of personal preference. We believe natural pink sapphires are a great “buy” and will only increase in collectibility and value. We have a very nice one arriving once our photography is completed.

Various shades of natural pink sapphires

Various shades of natural pink sapphires

Pink diamonds…SIGH. Rock of Eden was fortunate to purchase a natural pink diamond along with two white European diamonds over ten years ago. These stones were used to design a Rock of Eden original that will be featured in our Connoisseur’ section very soon. Pink diamonds have the most sparkle of the pinks under discussion here. They have risen dramatically with a half a carat vivid pink ring selling for $280,000 at an auction recently (2013). Vivid pink diamonds are nearly purple by the way. Pink diamonds as well as blue diamonds are highly collectible and continue to rise in value.

"Princie" Pink Diamond and "Argyle Pink Jubilee" Diamond

“Princie” Pink Diamond and “Argyle Pink Jubilee” Diamond

Pink color hues vary greatly within each stone variety, be it a pink diamond (J. Lo’s famous pink engagement ring was actually quite pale and not the most valuable color), a pink sapphire, a pink topaz or a pink tourmaline.

Pink topaz crystal and pink tourmaline crystal.

Pink topaz crystal and pink tourmaline crystal.

Pink topaz, which we have written about before, is commonly heat treated to achieve the pink color. Topaz is typically clear, brown or slightly amber and the pink is achieved by irradiating the brown variety of topaz leaving only the pink hue. Generally, we recommend natural stones rather than heated, budget permitting, with the exception of pink topaz. In all likelihood, pink topaz even that of antique jewelry, was heat treated and also foil backed to enhance the color even further. It doesn’t matter. This was the norm and old pink topaz is absolutely gorgeous if you can find it. It’s much prettier than the new pink topaz commonly available today.

Natural Pink Topaz and Diamond Antique Ring — This 14 carat gold ring (12mm N to S by 10 mm across) is estimated to be from the Victorian era with 12 old mine cut diamonds, approximately .15 to .18 carats each (total 1.8 carats), foil-backed (common in the day) oval pink topaz.

Finally, there is pink tourmaline. We love this stone in all it’s glorious hues as well. It is very affordable compared to the stones just mentioned. The pinks of pink tourmaline range from a deep sunset pink to a violet magenta pink — the color is phenomenal. For this stone it is more about color than sparkle and that’s okay too. Having yet another crystalline structure (we won’t bore you with the details) it provides a softer, sleepier shine that is still very pretty especially if it falls within the deeper pink varieties of the stone.
In a word it can be quite luscious.

Pink Tourmaline and Spike Necklace

Pink Tourmaline and Spike Necklace

There are other varieties of pink stones but we believe these to be the most beautiful in color choices and overall depth and saturation.

One thing is for sure…if you’ve seen one pink you have seen… one pink. The color variation seems endless and it is truly a delight to view various shades of pink. Forget fifty shades of grey. We’ll take fifty shades of pink any old time.





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